Academic Regulations

Undergraduate Admission Requirements
1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
  1. To be eligible for admission to Washington State University, an applicant must be a high school graduate or its equivalent, or have completed a more advanced transferable credential from a regionally accredited college or university (e.g., a transferable Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree).
  2. The total number of new students admitted for any one semester will be based on the number of students for whom facilities can be made available.
  3. Appeal of admission decisions may be made only to the Admissions Subcommittee of the Academic Affairs Committee or its designee.
  4. Anyone seeking admittance to the Graduate School must follow procedures in the Graduate School Policies and Procedures Manual available in the Graduate School.
  5. The university reserves a limited number of spaces in the incoming class for the admission of students with exceptional talent. Refer to the admission of students with extraordinary talents component of the Admissions policies section of the university catalog.

 

2. FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS

Freshman applicants are considered for admission on the basis of their academic records and other supporting documents, which include official transcripts that show coursework through at least grade 11 or its equivalent, completion of the Washington College Academic Distribution Requirements (CADRs), test scores (ACT or SAT), and other relevant materials as requested or as may be provided. On the basis of these criteria, the most qualified applicants are offered admission.

 

A complete list of the Washington College Academic Distribution Requirements (CADRs) for admission may be found at the Washington Student Achievement Council’s (WSAC) website, linked here www.cadr.wsu.edu.

 

Applicants from unaccredited high schools may contact the Office of Admissions for additional information.

 

Advanced Standing (Transfer Applicants)
4. TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS
  1. Applicants who have completed a transferable Associate’s degree from a regionally accredited post-secondary institution will be admitted as space allows.
  2. Applicants without a transferable Associate’s degree, but with at least 27 semester (40 quarter) hours of transferable credit from a regionally accredited post-secondary institution normally may be admitted as space allows provided they have at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. Applicants whose cumulative grade point average is lower than a 2.5 will have their academic record reviewed more comprehensively to determine admission eligibility.
  3. Applicants with fewer than 27 semester (40 quarter) hours of transferable credit will be considered for admission if they also meet the freshman requirements. Applicants whose cumulative transfer grade point average is lower than a 2.5 may have their academic record reviewed more comprehensively to determine admission eligibility.
  4. In evaluating admission credentials of students with transfer work whose cumulative transfer grade point average is below a 2.00, all of the post-secondary transfer credit from a previous institution may be disregarded, provided the work was completed not less than four years before the time of enrollment at Washington State University. Application of this policy is contingent upon the evidence of extenuating circumstances that present a significant probability of future academic success. The Faculty Admissions Subcommittee or its designee in the Office of Admissions will consider these admission requests. After the student has completed 15 semester hours of satisfactory work at WSU, the student may petition to restore the credits previously withheld. All credit earned in courses graded C or better will be considered for restoration and, if approved, only the courses and credit (not grades or grade points) will be restored.

 

6. TRANSFER CREDIT

(See Rule 114)

  1. Colleges and universities must be regionally accredited for transfer credit to be awarded.
  2. Ninety semester hours shall be the maximum allowed by transfer toward a baccalaureate degree.
  3. The maximum combined lower-division transfer credit allowed [from regionally accredited institutions, CLEP (College Level Examination Program), AP (Advanced Placement), IB (International Baccalaureate), Cambridge International, military credit, and any other source] shall be 73 semester credit hours toward a baccalaureate degree irrespective of when those hours were earned.
  4. Junior status, 60 semester credit hours, and completion of lower-division University Common Requirements (UCOREs) normally will be granted to students who have been awarded the Direct Transfer Associate (DTA) degree from a Washington community college. Additional courses, up to the 73 semester hour limit, will be reviewed for transfer on a course-by-course basis.  The Associate of Arts—Oregon Transfer (AAOT) degree from an Oregon community college guarantees completion of the lower-division University Common Requirements (UCOREs), but does not guarantee junior status or 60 semester credit hours. Certain approved associate degrees from Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Idaho may also be considered to have fulfilled the lower-division University Common Requirements (UCOREs) for graduation, but do not guarantee junior status or 60 semester credit hours. For details on specific degrees consult the Office of Admissions.
  5. Students who enter WSU with at least 60 transferable quarter credit hours and later complete one of the associate degrees listed in Rule 6 (d) or (f) will receive the benefits described in Rule 6 (d) or (f).
  6. Students who have completed the Associate of Science Transfer (AST) degree from a Washington community college normally will receive the same priority consideration for admission as they would for completing the Direct Transfer Associate (DTA) and will be given junior status and 60 semester credit hours.   Up to four additional courses that meet the University Common Requirements (UCOREs) must be met prior to the completion of a baccalaureate degree.  Additional courses, up to the 73 semester hour limit, will be reviewed for transfer on a course-by-course basis.
  7. Completion of lower-division University Common Requirements (UCOREs) will be granted to students who have been certified by their institution as having completed the lower-division general education curriculum at another regionally accredited Washington baccalaureate institution.
  8. Completion of lower-division University Common Requirements (UCOREs) will be granted to students who have been certified by their institution as having completed the University of California Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University General Education Breadth Curriculum.
  9. Completion of all University Common Requirements (UCOREs) will be granted to students who have completed a baccalaureate degree from another regionally accredited institution, provided that the general education program approximates that at WSU. 
  10. Other degrees, including international degrees, will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis for fulfillment of requirements, in the absence of an approved articulation.  Higher degrees do not necessarily fulfill baccalaureate degree requirements.

 

9. GRADE POINTS REQUIRED

Students entering with advanced standing must earn twice as many grade points for graduation as the number of hours which they have enrolled in this or any other institution.

 

14. CREDIT FROM INSTITUTIONS WITHOUT REGIONAL ACCREDITATION.

Students who have taken college-level, academic work at institutions that are not regionally accredited but are nationally accredited may petition for transfer of appropriate credits. Petitions may be filed after the student has completed a minimum of one semester (minimum of 15 credits) of satisfactory work at Washington State University. To receive credit, a student must have earned a minimum grade of C in the course for which he or she is requesting transfer credit. Petitions are reviewed and approved first by the Department Chair and then by the College Dean from the unit that offers courses in that discipline. The Vice Provost or designee reviews and approves petitions in cases where there is no equivalent WSU unit. Following approval by the Department and College (or Vice Provost or designee), the petition is then forwarded to the Chair of the Admission Subcommittee for review and approval. Students may contact the Office of Admissions for more information.

 

15. CREDIT BY EXAMINATIONS

CREDIT BY EXAMINATIONS. Subject to standards established in consultation with academic departments concerned, credit may be granted to entering or enrolled undergraduate or professional students via various means including external examinations, institutional examinations, approved military service schools, and prior learning assessment.  

 

Prior learning is defined as the knowledge and skills gained through work and life experience; through military training and experience; and through formal and informal education and training from in-state and out-of-state institutions, including foreign institutions.  Prior learning assessment is the process used to evaluate such experience for academic credit.

 

WSU does not accept credit by examination as transcripted by other institutions.   Students must provide official score reports to WSU.

 

Credits by examination shall yield no grade points. Such credits may partially fulfill University Common Requirements (UCOREs) for graduation. External examinations will include but not be limited to:  Advanced Placement (AP) Program examinations of the College Entrance Examinations Board; general and subject College Level Examination Program (CLEP); the International Baccalaureate (IB) Examinations; and Cambridge International Examinations.  

 

Students may request to take a course at WSU for which they have been awarded AP, IB, CLEP, or Cambridge International credit.  Prompted by the request, the AP, IB, CLEP, or Cambridge International credit is removed from the overall credits awarded by WSU.  Only the subsequent enrollment in the WSU course will contribute to the total hours earned and grade point average; the AP, IB, CLEP, or Cambridge International credit cannot be reconsidered for credit for the same course.  Students submit the request to ask for the WSU course to be allowed and for the AP, IB, CLEP, or Cambridge International credit to be omitted to the Registrar's Office.

 

(a)  Advanced Placement Program.  Credit for AP examinations will be granted in an amount equal to the lower-division course or courses in the particular discipline tested, as determined in consultation with the specific academic department. The acceptable score for receiving credit is published online at wsu.edu/advancedcredit.

 

(b)  College Level Examination Program (CLEP).  General and Subject Examinations:  Credit for CLEP will be granted if the examination is passed with scores established in consultation with the academic department concerned.  Credit will be granted for scores of 50 or above. Credit will be granted for the comparable Washington State University course, or elective credit may be granted. Not more than 6 semester hours of credit will be granted for each examination.

 

(c) Challenge Examinations.  Matriculated students currently registered at Washington State University, with permission of their advisor or department chairperson and of the chairperson of the department offering the course, may take challenge examinations for university credit in courses in which they are not registered.  Students may not take challenge examinations in courses which they have audited, or in which they have received a final grade.  Upper-division students may not receive credit by challenge examination in lower-division courses in their major field.  Undergraduate students may not receive credit by challenge examination in any course prerequisite to a course in which they are enrolled or have received a final grade.  The maximum credit for challenge examinations is 30 semester hours unless permission is obtained from the student’s academic dean.  Consult the Registrar’s Office for challenge exam fees.

 

(d) Peace Corps and Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) Credit for training in the Peace Corps or VISTA will be granted for having completed specific courses, under regular catalog course numbers, as shown on a regular transcript from a regionally accredited college or university.

 

(e) WSU Placement Examinations. Credit for WSU departmental placement examinations will be granted in accordance with policies established by the university and academic departments.

 

(f) International Baccalaureate (IB) Examinations.  Credit is awarded for higher-level examinations with a score of 4 or higher.  See wsu.edu/advancedcredit.   Upon completion of the IB diploma, 30 lower-division semester credit hours are awarded, in partial fulfillment of University Common Requirements (UCOREs).

 

(g)  Cambridge International Examinations.   Credit is awarded for A-level examinations.

 

16. MILITARY CREDIT

Credit will be evaluated on the basis of military transcripts received from active duty military and veterans pursuing an education at WSU.

 

(1) Transcript Credit:
(a) WSU uses the American Council on Education (ACE) "A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services" as a framework for evaluating transferable credit documented on military transcripts.
(b) ACE recommendations for the amount and level of credit (upper-division or lower-division) are followed if the military course (non-vocational/technical) is applicable to university or departmental requirements.


(2) DANTES Test Credit:  Credit for DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs) will be granted for college-level academic subjects (non-vocational/technical) using the minimum score and credit amount recommendations of the American Council on Education.

 

As noted in Academic Regulation 6, Transfer Credit, lower-division transfer credit is limited to 73 semester credits from all sources (transfer, credit by exam, military, other), and total transferable credit is limited to 90 semester credits.

 

Auditing Classes
20. PERMISSION TO AUDIT

An auditor is a student who is permitted on a space-available basis to observe class discussions but not take examinations or consume the instructor’s time.  

Attendance in class as an auditor requires official approval and enrollment.    Students may seek permission, after the start of classes, to audit a lecture course by securing the approval and signature of the class instructor on the Registrar's Enrollment Change Form.  Students may not attend classes as auditors past the second Friday of the semester (census day), or past the add deadline for shorter academic sessions, without being on the official class roster.

Students wishing to audit must pay the appropriate fee and bring the signed Enrollment Change Form to the Registrar's Office at the student's home campus by the end of the second week of instruction.  Students wishing to change their enrollment status from credit to audit, or audit to credit, must submit the Enrollment Change Form by the end of the second week of instruction.

A maximum of two audits are allowed for any semester or term.  A registration fee per audit hour is charged for any semester or term for other than regularly enrolled full-fee-paying students.  Senior citizens are exempt from this fee under the provisions of RCW 28B.15.540, provided the prescribed eligibility requirements are met.  Personnel who have received authorization for the faculty/staff fee waiver are exempt from the audit fee up to 6 hours (including audits) in any one semester or 4 hours (including audits) in the summer session.  The limitation includes any combination of credit and audit hours.  The audit fee is non-refundable.

 

21. NO CREDIT FOR AUDITING

No university credit will be allowed for auditing courses, nor may students apply for or take special examinations for university credit in courses which they have audited. Students may not take challenge examinations (see Rule 15c) in courses they have audited. (Audit enrollments will be recorded on the student’s permanent record by listing the departmental prefix, course number and the statement, “Audit Only -- No Credit Given.”)

 

Class Standing Of Students
25. CLASS STANDING

Freshman Standing —below 30 semester hours; Sophomore Standing—30 to 59 1/2 hours; Junior Standing—60 to 89 1/2 hours; Senior Standing—90 and above hours.

 

Credit
27. CREDIT DEFINITION

Academic credit is a measure of the total minimum time commitment required of a typical student in a specific course. For the WSU semester system one semester credit is assigned for a minimum of 45 hours. The expected time commitment may include: 1) time spent in scheduled course activities organized by an instructor (lectures, discussions, workbooks, videotapes, laboratories, studios, fieldwork, etc.); 2) time spent in group activities related to course requirements; and 3) time spent in reading, studying, problem solving, writing, and other preparations for the course. The minimum in-class time commitment, based on a 15-week semester and a traditional format, should follow these guidelines: 1) lecture—1 hour of lecture per week for each credit hour; 2) laboratory—3 hours of laboratory per week for each credit hour; 3) studio—2 hours of studio work per week for each credit hour; 4) ensemble—4 hours of ensemble work per week for each credit hour. The minimum time commitment for independent study is 3 hours of work per week for each credit hour. Courses taught in different time frames than the 15-week semester or in a different format need to define how the time commitment leads to the achievement of stated course goals. Achievement of course goals may require more than the minimum time commitment.

 

28. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

High school students may enroll at Washington State University provided they are admitted to the university and pay the appropriate fees. Such enrollments may be for high school or university credit or both. For fall and spring semesters, all eligible high school students enroll through Running Start. For Summer Session, special fees may apply.

 

29. WORK FROM HIGH SCHOOLS AND VOCATIONAL BUSINESS COLLEGES

No university credit shall be given for work from high schools or vocational business colleges. Recognized exceptions are College Board Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB), for which official score reports are required to award credit. Students are awarded transfer credit for Running Start (RS), College in the High School (CHS) and similar programs only when official college transcripts are presented. Credit is not granted on the basis of the high school transcript.

 

31. CREDIT TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR COURSES COMPLETED PRIOR TO HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

Washington State University encourages students to complete rigorous college preparatory courses in high school, or to take college courses while in high school if they have adequate preparation. In some cases college credit may be awarded when consistent with the following criteria.

  1. High School Courses: Some high schools may offer instruction at the college level, and when consistent with university and academic department policies, college credit will be awarded if student achievement is validated by an approved national examination such as Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate or Cambridge International, or a review or examination administered by the university.
  2. Running Start Program:  Credit will be awarded for college courses taken prior to high school graduation when such courses are completed through the state of Washington’s Running Start Program.
  3. Other Courses: College credit may be awarded for courses taken in high school when consistent with the following conditions:
    1. The course must also be currently available on the campus of the regionally accredited college or university and must be listed in the college or university catalog. The course, regardless of setting, must use the college or university curriculum.
    2. Students interested in credit must register and pay fees at the beginning of the term and would be subject to the same grading and tuition refund policies as students on the campus of the regionally accredited college or university.
    3. The faculty teaching the course in high school must carry a regular or adjunct faculty appointment at the regionally accredited college or university.
    4. The students taking the course in the high school must be assessed and graded in the same manner as students taking the course on the campus of the regionally accredited college or university. Student work, whether completed for the course offered on-campus or at the high school, must be graded and evaluated by the same standards.
34. REPEAT COURSES

Students may repeat a course in which they have received a grade of C- or below, or a withdrawal (W), or when a course may be repeated for additional credit. Students may enroll more than once in the same course in any given term (fall, spring, or summer) provided that the particular periods of enrollment do not overlap and that other conditions for allowed repeats are met.

  1. Repeating courses graded C- or below. To attempt to improve the cumulative grade point average, a student may repeat courses in which a C- or below was received. When such a course is repeated, only the last grade contributes to the grade point average and total hours earned. Students may repeat a course graded C- or below one time at WSU.  Additional repeats are allowed at WSU by special permission of the academic unit offering the course.  Repeats are allowed as transfer credit from another institution.  However, the series of repeats and grades is retained on the student’s academic record.
    1. Only courses identified as acceptable equivalents according to the appropriate department, the Transfer Guide, or the Admissions Office are treated as repeats. If courses deemed equivalent in content differ in credit hours, the credit hours of the repeat course supersede the credit hours of the original course.
  2. Repeating for additional credit.
    1. Some courses have been approved for repeat credit, i.e., the student may re-enroll in the course during a subsequent term and credit may be accumulated. Such courses are designated in the WSU catalog as “May be repeated for credit” and will list the maximum credit limitation.
    2. Courses which have been approved for repeat credit, such as topics, may offer multiple sections of a course during any one term. Students may enroll in more than one section of these courses in any one term provided that the specified particular topics and titles differ.

 

Undergraduate Academic Deficiency
35. 

Washington State University expects students to maintain academic standards of excellence and make satisfactory academic progress toward their degree objectives.  Undergraduate students are in good academic standing if both their current WSU semester and cumulative grade point averages are 2.00 or above, and/or they are eligible to be enrolled.  Students not meeting the criteria above are considered academically deficient.

 

38. 

Undergraduate students whose semester (excluding summer session) or cumulative grade point average drops below a 2.0 for the first time must apply for reinstatement to continue their enrollment at Washington State University.  Students are placed on probation after reinstatement.  Certified majors on academic probation may be decertified by the academic department.

 

39. 

Undergraduate students are dismissed from the University after the third semester (excluding summer session) in which the cumulative grade point average is below 2.0.  Individuals who are dismissed from the university must wait a minimum of two full semesters (fall/spring, spring/fall) to reenroll for courses offered through any WSU campus.  Dismissed individuals may not seek status as a 'non-degree seeking student.' Dismissed students may enroll in summer session.

 

40. 

Former students may seek reinstatement after two semesters by completing the academic reinstatement process.  Former students petitioning for academic reinstatement must, as part of the reinstatement petition process, provide documentation that demonstrates potential for academic success at WSU.  If seeking reinstatement after more than two semesters, former students must also apply for readmission to the University through the Office of Admissions.  All academic coursework from other institutions completed during dismissed status must be documented and official transcripts submitted to the Office of Admissions.

 

41. 

An undergraduate student who has been reinstated after becoming deficient under Rule 38 or 39 will be on academic probation. The specific conditions of enrollment for students who are on official probation will be determined by the interviewer or Review Board. Students on probation who fail to comply with the conditions of their probationary enrollment will be dismissed from the University.

 

42. 

Students enrolled in professional programs (e.g., clinical courses in nursing) that involve human health care may be subject to more stringent requirements in grading, repeating course work, and retention provided the more stringent requirements are approved through Faculty Senate channels and are published and are made available to students prior to certification. Students are referred to the nursing and pharmacy offices for specific requirements.

 

43. 

Former WSU students, dismissed under any academic deficiency rule, who have not been enrolled at WSU for four years or more may request at the time that they apply for readmission and reinstatement that all previous WSU work be disregarded. This includes all credits and grade points earned. Once the student is officially enrolled following the first day of the term, the student’s transcript will be marked to indicate that the previous work is not considered as credit earned. After the subsequent completion of 15 semester hours of course work with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher at WSU, the prior credits earned in courses graded C or better will be restored.  Only the courses and credit, not grades or grade points, will be restored.  Requests for reinstatement for former WSU students will be considered by the Review Board in the Academic Success and Career Center on the Pullman campus, WSU Online, or designated office on other campuses.

 

Conduct
45. 

Washington State University is guided by a commitment to excellence embodied in a set of core values. The university aims to create an environment that cultivates individual virtues and institutional integrity in the community. The mission of the university is supported when students uphold and take responsibility for the full scope of these values. The university’s core values are identified in its strategic plan. Under the terms of enrollment, students acknowledge the university’s authority to take disciplinary action for conduct on or off university property that is detrimental to the university’s core values. Students who violate the university Standards of Conduct are subject to discipline, which may include temporary or permanent removal from the university. (See the Standards of Conduct for Students.)

 

46. PENALTY FOR ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Cases of academic dishonesty shall be processed in accordance with the Academic Integrity Policy, as printed in the Student Handbook and the Faculty Manual and as available from the Office of Student Standards and Accountability.

 

Enrollment, Registration, Dropping Courses, and Withdrawals
47. PLACEMENT TESTS

All students will be required to take the regulation placement tests as a prerequisite to enrollment in appropriate courses.

 

50. PASS, FAIL GRADING OPTIONS

Pass, fail options are available for undergraduate and graduate students. The advisor’s approval is required for undergraduates. No courses designated as meeting University Common Requirements (UCOREs) may be taken pass, fail by any undergraduate. No more than two courses may be taken on a pass, fail basis during any given semester. Two courses is the limit for summer session.

 

A total of six courses may be taken on a pass, fail basis by students initiating and completing work for a baccalaureate degree at Washington State University. Students in the College of Veterinary Medicine with advisor approval may enroll for a total of six courses in the professional curriculum on a pass, fail basis, subject to the regulations listed above. University Honors College courses may be taken on a pass, fail basis only with the permission of the Honors College Dean.

 

Class 5 (except those working on second baccalaureate degree) and Class 6 (graduate) students are eligible to take courses on a pass, fail basis, but such work cannot be in the student’s official degree program or used for removal of a specific undergraduate deficiency. Credit hours earned under pass, fail are counted toward assistantship minimum hour requirements. There is no limit on the number of hours a graduate student may take on a pass, fail basis.

 

Allowances for transfer students are as follows:

Transfer status upon entering WSU   Pass/Fail Allotment
1-44 credits   six courses allowed pass, fail
45-59 credits   five courses allowed pass, fail
60-74 credits   four courses allowed pass, fail
75-89 credits   three courses allowed pass, fail
90 and above credits   two courses allowed pass, fail

 

A student may change a pass, fail enrollment to a regular letter-graded enrollment, or vice versa, during the first three weeks of classes in a semester. After the third week and through the last day of instruction in a semester (end of the 15th week), only a pass, fail enrollment can be changed to a letter-graded enrollment.

 

The P (pass) grades earned by pass, fail enrollees will not be included in computing the grade point average; however, F grades earned by pass, fail enrollees will be included in grade point average computations. Departments and programs may deny their majors permission to take, on a pass, fail basis, courses in their major field or courses needed to meet departmental requirements. Departments have the prerogative of requesting, from the Office of the Registrar, the letter grade for courses a prospective major has taken on a pass, fail basis. Departments and programs may refuse to accept courses needed to meet the above requirements if the courses were completed on a pass, fail basis before the student was accepted into the department or program.

 

52. PREREQUISITE COURSES

All prerequisites shall be satisfactorily completed before the student may register in a course.  At the time of registration for an upcoming term, in-progress enrollment counts toward meeting prerequisites.  If after grades are entered a prerequisite is no longer met, the course is dropped from the student’s enrollment.

The instructor may waive the prerequisite in the case of a student who has demonstrated competence or who has had academic experience equivalent to that represented by the prerequisite.  However, no student may have the prerequisite waived if the academic unit deems the waiver inappropriate.

 

53. MAJOR AND CERTIFICATION

The undergraduate major is the in-depth field of study leading to the degree and includes a set of core courses that has been approved by the academic unit offering the major, as well as the college, and the Faculty Senate.  The major represents approximately one-third of the credit hours required for the undergraduate degree, though some majors require a higher percentage of the total credit hours.  While most majors lead to a degree that shares the same name, some majors lead to a degree with a broader title (e.g., an Accounting major leads to the Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration).

 

Certification requirements:  The minimum university requirement for certification in a major is completion of 24 semester hours with a 2.00 grade point average.  Academic units may hold students to additional requirements, such as additional semester hours, a higher grade point average, or completion of specific courses.  Typically, students with 60 or more semester hours should be certified into a major. Students are certified in an academic major with the approval of the academic unit, and upon notification to the appropriate office on their respective campus. 

 

Consult the catalog for specific major and certification requirements.

 

54. UNDERGRADUATE MINORS AND ADDITIONAL MAJORS

Undergraduate minors and additional majors emphasize study in an area outside a student’s primary major.  An undergraduate minor or additional major is a supplemental academic award that is awarded at the same time that a student’s primary major is completed and the undergraduate degree is conferred. 

 

Students should consult with the department concerning specific certification requirements and restrictions for these supplemental academic awards.  The following general provisions apply:

 

a. Minors: 
1.  An undergraduate student who has completed 60 semester hours and is certified in a primary major may certify in a minor with the approval of the offering department.
2.  An undergraduate minor requires a minimum of 16 semester hours, 9 of which must be in upper-division work and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. 
3.  Unless otherwise noted by the certifying department, courses forming a minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements of a major.
4.  No student shall be required by their major to complete a minor, though the department may encourage students to complement the primary major with a minor. 
5.  Students may not be certified in a minor, or awarded a minor, if it carries the same name as any other current certifications or completed academic awards.  This includes current or completed certification in any area of study, such as degrees; majors; or options, concentrations, or subplans within the major.  However, a student who has earned a minor may be subsequently certified by a department to seek a higher academic award (e.g., a student who has earned a minor in English may later return to seek a degree in English). 

 

b.  Additional Majors:
1. An undergraduate student who has completed 60 semester hours and is certified in a primary major may certify in an additional major with the approval of the offering department.
2. An additional major requires completion of departmental requirements for the major, exclusive of general education requirements. 
3. Students may not be certified in an additional major, or awarded an additional major, if it carries the same name as any other current certifications or completed academic awards.  This includes current or completed certification in any area of study, such as degrees; majors; options, concentrations, or subplans within the major; or other supplemental academic awards, such as minors.  However, a student who has earned an additional major may be subsequently certified with departmental approval to seek a higher academic award (e.g., a student who has earned an additional major in Spanish may later return to seek a degree in Foreign Languages, with a major in Spanish).  
4. Note that for each additional baccalaureate degree, students must complete an additional 30 semester hours.  See Rule 118. 

 

 

55. CHANGE OF MAJOR

A student may change from one department to another only on approval of the chairpersons of the departments or deans concerned.

 

56. DECERTIFICATION AND RECERTIFICATION

A certified major who becomes academically deficient under Rules 38 or 39 and is decertified by the major department or program will be eligible to recertify, on a space-available basis, when the cumulative and major grade point averages are at or above the minimum level required for certification into the department.

A certified major who falls below the minimum departmental requirements (approved by Faculty Senate) may be decertified by the department after two semesters of falling below that minimum. The department must notify the student at the end of the first semester and establish conditions in writing that must be met the second semester. If conditions are not met at the end of the second semester, documentation must be provided to the Academic Success and Career Center along with the request to decertify a student.

 

57. STUDENT PETITIONS FOR EXCEPTIONS TO ACADEMIC CALENDAR DEADLINES AND WITHDRAWAL LIMITS

Students may, with the payment of a service fee, petition for exceptions to the academic calendar deadlines (e.g., withdrawal after the deadline) or petition for withdrawal from an individual course after the student has used the maximum number allowed.  Petitions are considered only in the case of extraordinary circumstances such as a medical emergency and require supporting documentation. Further information is available at the Registrar’s Office website under the link for Petitions.

Undergraduate and professional students may petition through the Registrar's Office.  Graduate students may petition through the Graduate School.  

Petitions for exceptions to the academic calendar deadlines and withdrawal limits must be made within two years of the date of enrollment in the course. 

 

61. LATE SERVICE FEE

A student who does not enroll before classes start or pay fees on or before the due date will be assessed a service charge. A charge of $100.00 will be assessed to late registrations that occur after the tenth day of classes. Late payment fees will be assessed those who pay tuition and fees after the due dates.

 

66. ADDING A COURSE

Students may add course enrollments through the fifth day of the semester. (NOTE: If the course is being added pass, fail the approval of the student’s faculty advisor is also required.)

 

After the fifth day of the semester, students may add course enrollments only with the permission of the instructor.

 

67. DROPPING A COURSE

A student may drop a course without record up to the end of the 30th day of the semester in which the course is offered or according to a prorated schedule for shorter academic terms.

 

68. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE
An undergraduate or professional student may withdraw from a course after the 30th day of the regular term up through the end of the 13th week with these provisions:
 
(a) At the end of each term, the number of withdrawals will be counted for undergraduate and professional students.  Once four withdrawals have been used, no further withdrawals will be allowed in subsequent terms. Withdrawals that result from the cancellation of enrollment will not be counted.  (For those entering WSU in fall 1998 through summer 2004, once six withdrawals have been used, no further withdrawals will be allowed in subsequent terms.) 
 
(b) After the withdrawal limit is reached, an undergraduate or professional student may, in exceptional circumstances, submit a petition through the Registrar’s Office for an exception to the withdrawal limit. See Rule 57.
 
(c) If a grade has been entered for a course, the grade may not be changed to a withdrawal without the instructor’s consent.
 
(d) Withdrawals do not reduce tuition charges. 
 
(e) For academic calendars that vary from the regular 15-week term, a prorated schedule will be used to determine the withdrawal deadline.
 
(f) The grade shall be marked W, and payment of the service fee shall be mandatory.
 
Graduate students who wish to request a course withdrawal after the 30th day must do so through the Graduate School.
 
70. CANCELLATION OF ENROLLMENT

Students who wish to withdraw from the institution and disenroll from all of their classes initiate the cancellation through the Registrar's Office website, cancel.wsu.edu. Students seeking to cancel their enrollment after completing one or more courses may petition for an exception to the academic calendar deadlines in the event of extraordinary circumstances (see Rule 57).

  1. Students canceling their enrollment during the first four weeks of the semester will have their permanent records marked "withdrew (date)." (Individual course enrollments will not be recorded.)
  2. Students canceling their enrollment after the fourth week through the last day of instruction (end of the 15th week) will have their permanent records marked "withdrew (date)," and a grade of W will be recorded for each course enrollment.
  3. Students on academic probation during the semester of their cancellation must obtain permission of the Academic Success and Career Center to re-enroll.

Related Link: Tuition Refund Adjustment Policy

 

Attendance
71. ADMISSION TO CLASSES

Students are not permitted to attend a class past the second Friday of the semester (census day), or past the add deadline for shorter academic sessions, without being on the official class roster.

 

72. CLASS ATTENDANCE DURING THE FIRST WEEK TO ENSURE ENROLLMENT

Students who have not attended class and laboratory meetings during the first week of the semester may be dropped from the course by the department. Students should not assume that they have been dropped without verification from the department or Registrar’s Office.

 

Students who believe that they have extenuating circumstances which prevent their attendance during the first week should notify the Dean of Students or Student Services. That office will notify instructors of the absence and the reason for it. Instructors shall determine whether to accept the excuse, waive the absence, and permit make-up work.

 

73. ABSENCES

Absences impede a student’s academic progress and should be avoided.

  1. UNIVERSITY SPONSORED. Any student who is required to participate in off-campus, university-sponsored activities such as field trips, musical performances, judging teams, intercollegiate athletic events, etc., should obtain an official Class Absence Request form from the faculty or staff member supervising the off-campus activity. The form must contain specific information concerning the activity and date, be signed by the supervising faculty or staff member, and be submitted by the student at least one week in advance to the individual instructors of the student’s classes. It is requested that a student not be penalized for absence from class provided a properly signed Class Absence Request form has been filed with the instructor prior to the absence. These university sponsored absences are subject to an instructor’s attendance policy and are not intended to imply additional acceptable absences. In all instances, it is the student’s responsibility to make up all work missed. Problem cases should follow the Academic Complaint Procedures, Rule 104.
  2. MILITARY SERVICE MEMBERS. Students who are members of the National Guard or a reserve branch of a military service are occasionally required to miss class for weekend drills, active duty, and related responsibilities. In such a case, instructors should not penalize students for the absences and should work with the student/s to make-up the missed assignment or examination. In each instance, it is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor of the duty before the absence and complete the missed work as soon as reasonably possible.
  3. OTHER EXCUSED ABSENCES. Students must sometimes miss examinations or other academic obligations affecting their grades because of illness, personal crises, mandated court appearances, parental responsibilities, and the like. As long as such absences are not excessive, it is recommended that the instructor provide and document reasonable accommodation. The instructor may require the student to submit a written explanation of the absence, but written excuses from health care personnel should not be required since these requests frequently put the health care personnel in untenable positions. A student who is dissatisfied with the instructor’s accommodation may follow the Academic Complaint Procedure, Rule 104. It is recommended that the instructor explain the procedures for excused absences early in the semester, preferably in a written syllabus distributed to all students in each class. Once announced, these procedures should be scrupulously followed unless extraordinary circumstances require an exception. Students who attempt to gain advantage through abuse of this policy (e.g., by providing an instructor with false information) may be referred to the Office of Student Standards and Accountability for disciplinary action.

 

Examinations
74. FINAL EXAMINATIONS WEEK

The final examination week for each fall and spring semester will span five days, from the Monday through the Friday immediately following the 15th week of the semester. Special examinations will be scheduled for the Saturday following the Friday of final examination week. Summer Session final exams will be confined to the designated class meeting times scheduled for the course or lab.

 

75. FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE

The final examination schedule will be determined before the start of each semester and published in the semester WSU Schedule of Classes by the Registrar based on previous enrollment for that semester. After publication, the schedule cannot be altered except as provided.

 

76. SPECIAL PERIODS FOR FINAL EXAMINATIONS

During examination week time will be allowed to large courses for special examinations of the entire group. The privilege of giving such special examinations is necessarily limited in terms of periods available for such tests. The courses having the greatest number of students will be given first opportunity to utilize the special examination periods available.

 

77. THREE OR MORE IN ONE DAY

During final examination week, if the scheduled arrangement results in students having three or more examinations scheduled for any one day, any one of their instructors is authorized to excuse the students from the regularly scheduled examination and give a final examination to the students during the special exams time blocks.

 

In cases of difficulty in arriving at a solution, students shall refer the matter to the chairpersons of their departments or to their academic advisors.

 

78. CLOSED WEEK

No examinations or quizzes (other than laboratory examinations, make-up examinations and make-up quizzes) may be given during the last week of instruction.

 

79. NO EARLY EXAMINATIONS

A student will not be granted special examinations for the purpose of leaving the institution before the close of the semester.

 

80. SCHEDULING ALL COMMON EXAMINATIONS

Instructors wishing to schedule examinations outside of normal class periods have two options: common examinations (Rule 80) and out-of-class examinations (Rule 81). Both of these options must yield priority to officially scheduled class meetings, including lectures, labs, and studios. For example, if a common examination is scheduled during a student's lab time in another course, the instructor must accommodate the student by offering alternate examination times.

 

Common examinations may be requested for courses having an enrollment of at least two percent of the total student body or undergraduate courses with multiple lecture sections.

 

Up to four common examinations may be scheduled outside the official class meeting time each semester. Common examination periods may be scheduled at the following time blocks:

 

Monday and Friday: 7:00 to 8:00 a.m.; 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.; and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday: 7:00 to 8:00 a.m.; 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; and 8:00 to 10:00 p.m.

 

One class period shall be omitted to compensate for each common examination given. A class period lost to Labor Day, Veterans Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day holiday(s), and/or any other class day omitted from the academic calendar may be counted toward this compensation for a common examination.

 

For prioritized scheduling, proposed common examination dates and times must be submitted to the Registrar's Office no later than April 1 for fall semesters and no later than October 1 for spring semesters. Common examination times will be confirmed no later than the Friday before priority registration for the future semester. Later requests for common examination dates will be accommodated through the first week of the semester, on a space-available basis.

 

In cases where an alternate time may be needed to accommodate conflicts, instructors may contact the Registrar's Office for that additional scheduling.

 

81. SCHEDULING OUT-OF-CLASS EXAMINATIONS

Instructors wishing to schedule examinations outside of normal class periods for a course that doesn’t meet the criterion of common examinations (see rule 80) may request out-of-class examinations.  Officially scheduled class meetings, including lectures, labs, and studios, and common exams have priority over out-of-class examinations.

 

Departments may schedule up to four out-of-class examinations at a fixed time for undergraduate (100-400-level) courses.  Out-of-class examination periods may be scheduled at the following time blocks:

 

Monday and Friday: 7:00 to 8:00 a.m.; 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.; and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday: 7:00 to 8:00 a.m.; 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; and 8:00 to 10:00 p.m.

 

One class period shall be omitted to compensate for each out-of-class examination given.  A class period lost to Labor Day, Veterans Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day holiday(s), and/or any other class day omitted from the academic calendar may be counted toward this compensation.  

 

Instructors wishing to schedule out-of-class examinations may submit the request beginning the first week of the term.  The scheduling priority will be common examination times followed by out-of-class examination on a space-available basis.  Except as noted for common examinations as per Rule 80, Rule 81 applies to any out-of-class examination scheduled to be taken at a fixed start and end time, including online examinations.

 

In cases where an alternate time may be needed to accommodate conflicts, instructors may contact the Registrar’s Office for that additional scheduling.

 

82. ACCOMMODATIONS OF RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS

Washington State University is committed to providing people of diverse religious backgrounds access to education. In addition, law requires reasonable accommodation of religious beliefs and practices. Because religious observances do not always conform to state and university holidays, tests or examinations that fall on these religious observances require reasonable accommodation. The university will provide reasonable accommodation consistent with the fair, efficient and secure administration of its programs. When tests or examinations fall on one or two days objectionable to a student because of religious beliefs, the student shall provide the instructor written notice 14 calendar days prior to the holiday. The written notice shall specify the date(s) and the reasonable accommodation requested. If the request appears to be made in good conscience, the instructor shall make alternate arrangements for administration of the examination or test, considering the integrity of the testing process and fairness to all the students. The instructor shall inform the student of the decision in writing within seven calendar days of the receipt of the request.Any student who believes that she or he has not been appropriately accommodated under this policy may seek review of the decision by sending a written request to the chairperson of the department offering the course, as soon as possible and no later than seven days after learning of the instructor’s decision. After the chair’s decision, the student or the instructor may appeal to the dean’s office. Appeals to the dean’s office must be presented in writing within seven calendar days of the chair’s decision. The decision of the dean or associate dean shall be made within seven calendar days and is final. The University Ombudsman is available at any stage for advice or assistance in resolving requests for accommodation. Students should understand that fairness in the examination process is an important consideration in the educational process and that they do have a duty to cooperate in making alternate arrangements.

 

83. ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS

Washington State University is committed to providing access to education for all of its students. In addition, federal law states that academic requirements must be modified on a case-by-case basis to afford qualified students with handicaps an equal educational opportunity. The nature of certain disabilities may necessitate accommodation of these disabilities in the administration of exams. It is the policy of the university to provide reasonable accommodation consistent with the fair and secure administration of its programs.

 

A student with a disability who may require special accommodation should contact the Access Center (or Office of Student Services) when he or she arrives on the WSU Pullman campus. On the branch campuses a student should contact the Office of Student Services. A file documenting the disability will be established, and an accommodation form initiated. The instructor may ask for verification of a disability when a student requests an accommodation for an examination. The Office of Student Services or Access Center provides the student with a disability with an accommodation form verifying a disability and specifying the appropriate testing accommodation designed to fit the individual needs of that student. If the instructor disagrees with the arrangements as presented in the form, the instructor and/or student should seek the assistance of the Access Center (or Office of Student Services), department chair, cognizant dean or Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, in that order. The student and instructor may also contact the University Ombudsman or Office for Equal Opportunity.

 

88. MIDTERM GRADE SUBMITTAL.

Midterm grades will be submitted for students enrolled in undergraduate courses by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday of the eighth week of the fall and spring semesters.

 

The assessment should not be interpreted as a formal grade, but rather as an indication of the student’s progress to date.

 

Midterm grades are advisory and do not appear on the student’s permanent record, the WSU transcript.

 

89. FINAL GRADE SUBMITTAL

Final grades will be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. on the second working day after the close of finals week. (Final grades for Summer Session will be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. on the second working day following the last day of Summer Session. Departments may be requested to submit final grades for summer courses earlier than the official submission deadline to facilitate grade reporting to students.)

 

Grades And Grade Points
90. GRADES AND GRADE POINTS

Washington State University uses letter grades and the four (4) point maximum grading scale. The grade A is the highest possible grade, and grades below D are considered failing. Plus (+) or minus (-) symbols are used to indicate grades that fall above or below the letter grades, but grades of A+ and D- are not used. For purposes of calculating grade points and averages, the plus (+) is equal to .3 and minus (-) equals .7 (e.g., a grade B+ is equivalent to 3.3 and A- is 3.7). A student’s work is normally rated in accordance with the following definitions:

90a. A. Student work demonstrates consistently excellent scholastic performance; thorough comprehension; ability to correlate the material with other ideas, to communicate and to deal effectively with course concepts and new material; reliability in attendance and attention to assignments.

90b. B. Student work demonstrates superior scholastic performance overall, reliability in attendance, and attention to assignments; may demonstrate excellence but be less consistent than the work of an A student.

90c. C. Student work demonstrates satisfactory performance overall, as well as reliability in attendance, and attention to assignments.

90d. D. Student work demonstrates minimal, barely passing performance overall; limited knowledge of subject matter.

90e. F. Student work demonstrates unsatisfactory performance and comprehension or unfulfilled requirements. The grade is failing.

90f. S. (Satisfactory.)  Grade given upon satisfactory completion of courses numbered 499, 600, 700, 701, 702, 800, special examinations (Rule 15) and other courses duly authorized for S, F grading by the Faculty Senate.  (Courses approved for S, F grading are footnoted in the Schedules of Classes.)  Courses approved for S, F grading may also be graded S at midsemester indicating satisfactory progress.
     A, S, or F grades only are used to report physical education activity grades.
     S, M (marginally satisfactory), or F grades only are used to report grades for designated courses within the College of Veterinary Medicine.  
     H (honors), S, or F grades only are used to report grades for designated courses within the College of Pharmacy. 

90g. P. (Passing.) A satisfactory grade for a course taken under the pass, fail Grading Option. Instructors will turn in regular letter grades for all students enrolled in courses under the pass, fail option but grades will appear on the student’s permanent record as P (Passing) or F (Failure).

90h. I. (Incomplete.) An incomplete is the term used to indicate that a grade has been deferred. It is for students who for reasons beyond their control are unable to complete their work on time. All outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and blank/no grade) must be completed and posted to the official transcript prior to the conferral of the degree. It is strongly recommended that students who are granted an Incomplete limit their total number of credits to 18 credits (including credits for the Incomplete course and any new courses) during the semester when they are finishing an Incomplete.  Students who receive an I grade have up to the end of the ensuing year to complete the course, unless a shorter interval is specified by the instructor. If the incomplete is not made up during the specified time or the student repeats the course, the I is changed to an F. (See Rule 34.) Faculty are required to submit an Incomplete Grade Report (IGR) to the departmental office with every I given. The IGR must specify conditions and requirements for completing the incomplete, as well as any time limitations less than one year.

90i. W. This is the term to be used if the student has filed, in the Registrar’s Office, official notice of a withdrawal from the course prior to the end of the ninth week, or withdrew passing in accordance with Rule 69, or withdrew from the university in accordance with Rule 70.

90j. X. Denotes continuing progress toward completion of special problems, research, thesis, doctoral dissertation (i.e., 499, 600, 700, 701, 702, 800), or flexible enrollment courses; X grades are converted to S or to a letter grade upon completion. An X grade may also be used when no final grade is available due to instructor’s illness or absence, or due to a pending administrative action outside of the instructor's control.  All outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and blank/no grade) must be completed and posted to the official transcript prior to the conferral of the degree. 

90k. U. (Unsatisfactory.) Student work demonstrates unsatisfactory performance, failed examination, or unfulfilled requirements in courses numbered 700, 701, 702, and 800.

90l. Z. (Failure due to discontinued attendance without withdrawal.) The Z grade is an internal grade indicating that a student earned a failing grade and discontinued all participation in a course without formally withdrawing from the course.  It appears and functions as an F rather than as a Z on the transcript. An instructor entering a Z grade must enter the last date of attendance for each Z grade submitted.  If the last day of attendance is not available, the date of the last exam or assignment recorded must be submitted instead.

 

92. GRADE RECORDS

Class grade records (the records from which final grades for a given class are determined) are university records which must be maintained for five years after the end of the term. Department chairs or directors are responsible for identifying appropriate storage location, which may include the instructor’s campus office. Both the chair or director or their designees and the instructor shall have ready access to these records.

 

93. RETENTION OF FINAL EXAMINATIONS, FINAL PROJECTS, AND FINAL PAPERS

Final examinations, final projects, and final papers are university records which must be maintained for one year after the end of the term, unless they are returned directly to the student. Department chairs or directors are responsible for identifying appropriate storage location, which may include the instructor’s campus office. Both the chair or the director or their designees and the instructor shall have ready access to these final examinations, final projects, and final papers.

 

98. CORRECTION OF GRADE ERRORS

An instructor may not change a grade after it has been filed with the Registrar, except in the case of clerical error, which the instructor may correct by so certifying to the Registrar. Such change must be approved (signature required) by the chairperson of the department in which the course was offered. Grade corrections must be processed within one year of the end of the term for which the original grade was given. In extenuating circumstances, exceptions to the one-year limit for correction of grade errors may be considered by petition to the Registrar’s Office.

 

99. GRADUATE STUDENT GRADES

On a program leading to an advanced degree, graduate students must attain a minimum grade point average of 3.00 on their graduate programs and a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all 300-400-level and graduate courses. No grade below C is accepted in any course for graduate credit.

 

100. THE GRADE POINT SYSTEM
A provides 4.0 grade points per credit hour.
A- provides 3.7 grade points per credit hour.
B+ provides 3.3 grade points per credit hour.
B provides 3.0 grade points per credit hour.
B- provides 2.7 grade points per credit hour.
C+ provides 2.3 grade points per credit hour.
C provides 2.0 grade points per credit hour.
C- provides 1.7 grade points per credit hour.
D+ provides 1.3 grade points per credit hour.
D provides 1.0 grade points per credit hour.
F provides no credit or grade points. (Credits attempted are calculated in GPA).
P credit given—grade points not calculated.
S credit given—grade points not calculated.
M credit given—grade points not calculated.
I provides no credit or grade points.
W provides no credit or grade points.
X provides no credit or grade points.
U provides no credit or grade points.

  

102. STUDENT'S SCHOLASTIC AVERAGE

A student’s scholastic average is determined by adding the grade points earned in all WSU course work and dividing by the total number of hours in which the student has been enrolled at WSU. I, W, S, P, U, and X grades are disregarded.

 

103. GROUP AVERAGES

Group averages, honor rolls, eligibility lists for honorees, and similar lists are calculated on the basis of grades received in the Registrar’s Office by 5:00 p.m. two working days following the last day of final examinations.

 

104. ACADEMIC COMPLAINT PROCEDURES

Students having complaints about instruction or grading should refer them first to the instructor. If the complaint is not resolved, then the student may refer the complaint in writing to the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered by the end of the last day of the following semester (excluding summer term). The chair’s decision shall be rendered within 20 business days. After the chair’s decision, the student or the instructor may appeal to the Dean’s Office. Complaints must be presented in writing to the dean within 20 business days of the chair’s decision. The written statement should describe the complaint, indicate how it affects the individual or unit, and include the remedy sought from the dean. The decision of the dean is the final step and shall be made within 20 business days.  At the urban campuses, the procedure is identical except that the academic area coordinator shall substitute for the department chair and the campus chancellor shall substitute for the college dean, if the department chair and/or the college dean is not located on the urban campus.

 

The University Ombudsman is available at any stage for advice or assistance in resolving academic complaints. 

 

Note: Though chairs and deans (and academic area coordinators and campus chancellors) may resolve complaints about instruction and grading, they may not change a final grade without the consent of the instructor, except as provided by Rule 105.

 

105. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES TO FINAL GRADES

a.) Chairperson Acting in Lieu of Instructor:  In the extraordinary circumstances when an instructor is not available, or has failed to respond within 20 business days according to Rule 104, then the chairperson of the department may change a final grade.

b.) University Grade Appeals Board:  If a chair, dean, Graduate School Dean, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or designee, or University Ombudsman determines that a change of a final grade is warranted for any reason other than academic dishonesty, any one of them may refer the case to the chair of the University Grade Appeals Board for review.  The case must be referred within one semester of the posting of the grade (excluding summer term).  

The University Grade Appeals Board shall have jurisdiction over decisions of any instructor and/or administrator on matters of University course grading appeals.  The decision of the board is final and not subject to further appeal.

Note: Students may not take a grade appeal directly to the board but should follow the academic complaint procedures, as presented in Rule 104.

c.) University Academic Integrity Hearing Board:  If an allegation of academic dishonesty is not resolved between the instructor and the student, then the case is referred to the University Academic Integrity Hearing Board.  The case must be referred to the board within one semester (excluding summer term).  The University Academic Integrity Hearing Board shall have jurisdiction over decisions of any instructor on matters of grading related to academic dishonesty cases.  The decision of the board is final and not subject to further appeal.

 

Graduation
106. UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION FOR DEGREE

Students may apply for their undergraduate degrees online as soon as they have completed 90 credits and are certified in the major.  Advisors and the students’ major department are responsible for checking that all departmental requirements are met through the advisement report / degree audit.  A graduation fee must be paid at the time of application.  See http://graduations.wsu.edu/ for further information.

 

108. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR GRADUATION

The student has the ultimate responsibility for meeting all graduation requirements.   The student plans the program of study each semester in consultation with the advisor.  The degree requirements listed in the catalog and in the advisement report are binding.  Colleges may substitute or waive college-level requirements for individual students.  Departments may substitute or waive departmental requirements for individual students.

 

109. PETITIONS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The Provost’s Office may substitute or waive university-level undergraduate graduation requirements.  Students may petition to substitute or waive university-level graduation requirements by completing and submitting the University and College Requirement Petition form.

 

110. UNDERGRADUATE UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The University requirements for graduation must be satisfied prior to the awarding of an undergraduate degree.  Students meet the University requirements for graduation, including general education requirements, as follows:
 
a) New students are held to the University requirements that are published in the catalog with the effective date that corresponds to their Admission term.
 
b) Former students who are readmitted to WSU are held to the University requirements that are published in the catalog at the time they are readmitted and reflect their most current admission term.  
 
c) Students who apply to graduate who are not currently enrolled will be held to the University requirements as follows:
i. Students applying to graduate through Summer 2016 will be held to the General Education Requirements listed in the 2009 WSU Catalog.
ii. Students applying to graduate beginning Fall 2016 will be held to the University Core Requirements listed in the 2012 WSU Catalog.
 
Students who were enrolled at WSU prior to Fall 2012 may petition to fulfill the University requirements based on an earlier set of requirements.  All students may request to substitute their University and general education requirements for the most current set of those requirements.
 
111. UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR, MINOR, AND COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Graduation requirements for a student’s degree are set at the time the student certifies the major and include college requirements.  Graduation requirements for additional majors, minors, or other academic awards are set at the time of certification for those additional academic plans.  The following exceptions apply:
 
a) All students after the time of certification may be required by the department to meet new major or minor requirements, provided the newer requirements neither oblige a student to enroll in more than a normal complement of credit hours in any semester nor prolong the time necessary to complete degree requirements.  
 
b) Current students whose certification in the major or minor is more than eight years old may be required by the department to re-certify in the major or minor in order to meet current degree requirements.  This may in some cases prolong the time necessary to complete the degree.
 
c) Former students who must reapply and be readmitted to WSU will be admitted as non-certified regardless of their prior certification status.  These students will be eligible to recertify, on a space-available basis, when they meet the current requirements for certification set by the department.
 
d) Students who apply to graduate and who have not attended WSU for six or more years will need approval from their major department to complete the degree in the major in which they were previously certified.  In some cases these students may be held to more current requirements which may prolong the time necessary to complete the degree.  Students may choose to seek certification in a different major without being readmitted to the university in order to earn a degree.
 
e) Students shall have eight years to complete any degree, major, minor, or other academic award that has been discontinued, following the last inclusion in the WSU Catalog.
 
Department and program chairs have the authority to waive or provide substitute course work for major or minor requirements.  Colleges have the authority to waive or provide substitutes for college requirements.
 
114. REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

a. The award of a baccalaureate degree requires the student’s satisfaction of all University graduation requirements.  The degree grade point average will be posted at the time that the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

b. The award of a baccalaureate degree requires the completion of and posting to the official transcript of all outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and no/blank grades).

c. The award of a baccalaureate degree and/or diploma requires the student’s good standing in the university and satisfaction of all University graduation requirements.  “Good standing” means the student has resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct, and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of the misconduct.  The University shall have the sole authority in determining whether to withhold the degree and/or diploma in cases where the student is not in good standing due to acts of misconduct, has not resolved any acts of academic or behavior misconduct, or has not complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  The University shall deny the award of a degree if the student is dismissed from the University based on his or her misconduct.  Neither diplomas nor transcripts will be sent until students have resolved any unpaid fees and resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  (See Rule 45 and the Standards of Conduct for Students.)

d.  To complete a baccalaureate degree, students shall:

1) Earn a 2.0 cumulative grade point average or better in graded course work, in this or any institution for which a grade has been received.

2) Earn a 2.0 cumulative grade point average or better in graded course work in the major.

3) Complete the departmental and college requirements for an active baccalaureate degree.  Baccalaureate degrees remain active for the purpose of degree completion for eight years following the last inclusion in the WSU catalog.

4) Earn a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit.  At least 30 must be WSU hours; see Rule 6.

5) Earn a minimum of 40 semester hours of credit in 300-400-level courses; 500-level courses will count toward the 300-400-level requirement, but an undergraduate may not be required to complete a 500-level course as a requirement for the baccalaureate degree.

6) Complete the University Common Requirements (UCOREs) for Graduation.

7) Complete the university writing requirements, including two Writing in the Major courses and the Writing Portfolio.

 

115.  REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROFESSIONAL DEGREES (DVM AND PHARMD)
  1. To earn a professional degree, students shall complete all requirements specified for the degree.
  2. The award of a professional degree requires the completion of and posting to the official transcript of all outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and no/blank grades).
  3. The award of a professional degree and/or diploma requires the student’s good standing in the university and satisfaction of all University graduation requirements.  “Good standing” means the student has resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct, and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of the misconduct.  The University shall have the sole authority in determining whether to withhold the degree and/or diploma in cases where the student is not in good standing due to acts of misconduct, has not resolved any acts of academic or behavior misconduct, or has not complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  The University shall deny the award of a degree if the student is dismissed from the University based on his or her misconduct.  Neither diplomas nor transcripts will be sent until students have resolved any unpaid fees and resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  (See Rule 45 and the Standards of Conduct for Students.)

 

116. REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES
  1. The Graduate School has no residency requirement.
  2. All outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and no/blank grade) must be completed and posted to the official transcript prior to the conferral of the master's degree.  Once a degree is conferred and posted to the official transcript, no changes will be allowed on the academic record that predates the degree.
  3. The award of a master's degree and/or diploma requires the student’s good standing in the university and satisfaction of all University graduation requirements.  “Good standing” means the student has resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct, and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of the misconduct.  The University shall have the sole authority in determining whether to withhold the degree and/or diploma in cases where the student is not in good standing due to acts of misconduct, has not resolved any acts of academic or behavior misconduct, or has not complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  The University shall deny the award of a degree if the student is dismissed from the University based on his or her misconduct.  Neither diplomas nor transcripts will be sent until students have resolved any unpaid fees and resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  (See Rule 45 and the Standards of Conduct for Students.)
  4. To complete a master's degree, a student shall:
  • Earn no fewer than 30 semester hours of credit with a minimum of 21 semester hours of course work for a thesis degree program or 26 semester hours of course work for a nonthesis degree program.
  • Earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 on a graduate program in all upper-division and graduate course work completed for the master's degree.
  • Earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 for all course work taken as a graduate student.
  • Successfully complete graduate examinations.

 

117. REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTOR'S DEGREES
  1. The Graduate School has no residency requirement.
  2. All outstanding incomplete work (including grades of I, X, and no/blank grade) must be completed and posted to the official transcript prior to the conferral of the doctoral degree.  Once a degree is conferred and posted to the official transcript, no changes will be allowed on the academic record that predates the degree.
  3. The award of a doctoral degree and/or diploma requires the student’s good standing in the university and satisfaction of all University graduation requirements.  “Good standing” means the student has resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct, and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of the misconduct.  The University shall have the sole authority in determining whether to withhold the degree and/or diploma in cases where the student is not in good standing due to acts of misconduct, has not resolved any acts of academic or behavior misconduct, or has not complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  The University shall deny the award of a degree if the student is dismissed from the University based on his or her misconduct.  Neither diplomas nor transcripts will be sent until students have resolved any unpaid fees and resolved any acts of academic or behavioral misconduct and complied with all sanctions imposed as a result of misconduct.  (See Rule 45 and the Standards of Conduct for Students.)
  4. To complete a doctoral degree, a student shall:
  • Earn no fewer than 72 semester credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree to include the minimum requirements as listed in the Graduate School's Policies and Procedures and as established by the academic program.
  • Earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 on a graduate program and in all 300-400-level and graduate course work completed for the doctoral degree.
  • Earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 for all course work taken as a graduate student.
  • Successfully complete graduate examinations.

 

118. TWO OR MORE BACCALAUREATE DEGREES FROM WSU

One baccalaureate degree from WSU requires a minimum of 120 semester hours.  For each additional baccalaureate degree, the student must complete an additional 30 semester hours, as well as satisfy all requirements of the college and the second degree program.  For a second or subsequent baccalaureate degree, the first baccalaureate degree from WSU is understood to fulfill all University requirements for graduation, including the upper-division requirements, University Writing Portfolio, the minimum hours for the first degree (120), as well as the University Common Requirements (UCOREs).

 

121. SUMMER SESSION CREDITS

Credit earned during summer sessions may be applied toward the fulfillment of requirements for baccalaureate and advanced degrees in the same manner and subject to the same rules as credit earned during semesters of regular academic years.

 

125. DATE OF GRADUATION

Students will be recommended for their degrees at the end of the semester or term in which they complete their requirements. Diplomas will be dated the Saturday following the last day of final examination week for the fall semester, the day of commencement for the spring semester, and the Saturday following the last day of instruction for summer session.

 

Honors
133. PRESIDENT'S HONOR ROLL

An undergraduate will be named to the President's Honor Roll under either of the following conditions:

  1. By achieving a grade point of 3.75 while enrolled in at least 9 graded hours in a single semester at Washington State University,  provided that the cumulative GPA is a 2.0 or better.
  2. By achieving a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 based on at least 15 cumulative hours of graded work at Washington State University, provided that the semester GPA is a 3.0 or better.

 

137. RECOGNITION FOR SELECTED BACCALAUREATE DEGREE CANDIDATES

Candidates for baccalaureate degrees who have completed at least 30 hours of graded work (grades in which grade points are awarded) at Washington State University will graduate summa cum laude if the cumulative grade point average for work completed at Washington State University is 3.90 or better, will graduate magna cum laude if the minimum cumulative grade point average is 3.70 but less than 3.90, and will graduate cum laude if the minimum cumulative grade point average is 3.50 but less than 3.70.

 

The appropriate Latin phrase will be printed on the diploma and on the final transcript. Qualified students electing to participate in the Honors College who complete its requirements satisfactorily, regardless of whether they qualify to graduate summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude, will receive a certificate of completion and a printed notation on the final transcript.

 

Computation of graduation honors will be done prior to the end of the final semester to allow for publication of the appropriate honors in advance of graduation. However, following the student’s final semester, the Registrar will recompute the student’s GPA including the last semester’s work, and only this computation will determine official graduation honors.

 

Soliciting
150. 

No agent, solicitor, or university individual or group shall be permitted to canvass or solicit faculty members during office hours in the interests of business, charity, or any other purpose not directly connected with university interest or official duties.